A raisin in the sun summary. A Raisin in the Sun Act I scene i Summary and Analysis

A Raisin in the Sun

a raisin in the sun summary

Walter asks Ruth to try to persuade his mother, Lena, to use part of the coming check to invest in the store. Beneatha's college friend from Africa, a Mr. Walter has always wanted to be rich, not only to be rich but to be successful and to have the respect of a successful man. Mama was the one that saw past all the little things that would hold her back from completing her dream. Ruth Younger Walter's wife is a thirtyish, very laidback woman. At the end of the scene, Mama discovers that Ruth has fainted and fallen to the floor. Have salt in yourselves, and have peace one with another.

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A Raisin in the Sun Act 1, Scene 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

a raisin in the sun summary

Although they are poor, still their house is clean; although the furniture is old, there is still the ritualistic weekly polishing. Sent by the Clybourne Park Improvement Association, Mr. If we need a lesson on dreaming and on being brave enough to dream, a great first stop on the literary highway is A Raisin in the Sun. Beneatha talks to a transfer student from Africa, Asagai, about Africa and going back to find her roots. The night before the play begins, Travis has been up late because his father had friends over and the young boy was not able to go to sleep until they left. The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested.

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A Raisin in the Sun Introduction

a raisin in the sun summary

Raisin opens on a Friday morning as everyone is getting ready to leave the apartment for their respective obligations: Walter Lee and Ruth have to go to their jobs; Travis and Beneatha have to go to school. This perplexes our detective minds, because we thought dreams were the star of the show. She makes Beneatha consider this question: who is Beneatha to write his epitaph — to write him off as though he no longer exists just because she is so angry at him? We've all got acute ghetto-itis Beneatha says this when Asagai drops by to visit, immediately after the Younger family has had a depressing conversation about their financial station in life and Ruth's possible pregnancy. The matriarch of the family, Mama, wants to buy a house to fulfill a dream she shared with her husband. The family gives Mama gifts of gardening tools and a gardening hat to use at their new home. Therefore, beneath the seemingly normal brother-sister dissent lies a fierce struggle for the survival of each individual's dreams.

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A Raisin in the Sun Summary

a raisin in the sun summary

The mother objects mainly for ethical reasons; she is vehemently opposed to the idea of selling liquor. They can't afford more children. He ran off with it. Forbes' play revolves around a mother's lie to her children about a nonexistent bank account. Mama wanted Travis to have his own room, and by this she sacrificed her own personal room for that by sharing with Beneatha in the new house.

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A Raisin in the Sun Act 1 Scene 1 Summary

a raisin in the sun summary

An intellectual gap, however, also compounds the generational difference between Mama and her daughter Beneatha. The carpet is threadbare from vacuuming; the furniture is worn from dusting; the apartment is sprayed weekly to keep roaches away. In the introduction by , he writes that the scene is included in print because it draws attention away from a seemingly happy ending to a more violent reality inspired by Hansberry's own experiences. On the other hand, Mama takes pride and finds strength in her religious convictions, which she has tried to instill in her children. Ruth suggests that Lena might want to take a trip or do something fun with the money.

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Act I — Scene 2

a raisin in the sun summary

He has strong feelings for her and wants her to pursue her dreams. I listen to you every day, every night and every morning, and you never say nothing new. Walter is a chauffeur for a white man. The frustration Walter Lee exhibits in this scene is recognizable by everyone who has ever felt ignored in spite of loud cries to be heard. Beneatha made this statement to Asagai when they first met, a remark he had found amusing. Nigeria finally became independent and a member of the British Commonwealth of Nations, and, in 1963, it became a republic.

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